Journalism/Politics
todaysdocument:

Statement of Senator John F. Kennedy Announcing Candidacy for President of the United States,  January 2, 1960

todaysdocument:

Statement of Senator John F. Kennedy Announcing Candidacy for President of the United States,  January 2, 1960

When my then girlfriend agreed to be my wife, I told her it was time to have the discussion about her converting. She said, ‘Don’t worry, I’ve already talked to the Rabbi and started the process of becoming Jewish. I know our kids will be growing up in a house without a Christmas Tree and I’m okay with that.’


But that wasn’t the conversion I was talking about. I explained to her that our kids would be growing up in a house without Windows-based PCs. And then I gave her my old Mac Plus and said, ‘Lady, this is your life now.’

I Made This On A Mac (via npr)
stfuconservatives:

thegirlwiththefinchertattoo:

swoozi:

This is tragic.  

USA!  USA!  USA!

Capitalism isn’t the problem, the American rich are.
-Joe

stfuconservatives:

thegirlwiththefinchertattoo:

swoozi:

This is tragic.  

USA!  USA!  USA!

Capitalism isn’t the problem, the American rich are.

-Joe

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Bad Light” Atherton
James Atherton always wanted the unique angle. He was willing to sacrifice the perfect environment to get the best shot. (Other photographers gave him his nickname for his apparent disregard for light.) Sometimes this got him into trouble. The above photo was not taken by Atherton but taken of Atherton. Once again trying to capture that unusual look Atherton took to the stage during a speech by President John F. Kennedy to try and capture a “Hail Mary” shot - one taken without looking through the viewfinder. When Kennedy’s press secretary saw what happened he was livid but JFK when he saw the photo in the paper, cut it out, signed it and sent it to Atherton with a note: “Two men at work.”
Atherton, who took pictures for Acme (which became part of UPI) and the Washington Post retired in 1990, after five decades which included covering every president from Truman to Nixon.
He also covered the civil rights movement. His iconic image of that period was taken on August 29, 1963 during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom which is best known for Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” Speech. Atherton attached his camera to a bamboo pole, hoisted it over the shoulder of Lincoln’s statue and took this:

Amazing what a different angle can illustrate.
Mr. Atherton was 83.
(Main image is courtesy of the Post via the Atherton Family. The second image is copyright of Atherton/UPI.)

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: “Bad Light” Atherton

James Atherton always wanted the unique angle. He was willing to sacrifice the perfect environment to get the best shot. (Other photographers gave him his nickname for his apparent disregard for light.) Sometimes this got him into trouble. The above photo was not taken by Atherton but taken of Atherton. Once again trying to capture that unusual look Atherton took to the stage during a speech by President John F. Kennedy to try and capture a “Hail Mary” shot - one taken without looking through the viewfinder. When Kennedy’s press secretary saw what happened he was livid but JFK when he saw the photo in the paper, cut it out, signed it and sent it to Atherton with a note: “Two men at work.”

Atherton, who took pictures for Acme (which became part of UPI) and the Washington Post retired in 1990, after five decades which included covering every president from Truman to Nixon.

He also covered the civil rights movement. His iconic image of that period was taken on August 29, 1963 during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom which is best known for Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” Speech. Atherton attached his camera to a bamboo pole, hoisted it over the shoulder of Lincoln’s statue and took this:

Amazing what a different angle can illustrate.

Mr. Atherton was 83.

(Main image is courtesy of the Post via the Atherton Family. The second image is copyright of Atherton/UPI.)

nevver:

Occupy Everything

npr:

msnbc:

Our boy Brian Williams stays amazingly cool during a fire alarm throughout the broadcast last night in 30 Rock

———————————————————————————————————-

This totally happened on Talk of the Nation once! We were broadcasting from the Newseum in front of a studio audience when the building’s alarms started going off. The audience stayed put and the director (me), Neal Conan and his guests stuck to the script and kept the show going, as booker David Gura attempted to muffle the sound with a jacket. And just like it did for Brian Williams, everything turned out ok. —Sarah

motherjones:

That’s 199% awesome.
We’ve liveblogging OWS’s big night here.
bryanboova:

MacLeod Cartoons: What the Occupy Movement is About
ourpresidents:

Shortly after noon on November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated as he rode in a motorcade through Dealey Plaza in downtown Dallas, Texas. 
Crowds of excited people had lined the streets to wave to the Kennedys that afternoon.  The Presidential procession traveled along a ten-mile route that wound through downtown Dallas on the way to the Trade Mart where the President was scheduled to speak at a luncheon.
The car turned off of Main Street at Dealey Plaza around 12:30 p.m.  As it was passing the Texas School Book Depository, gunfire suddenly reverberated in the plaza.  Read more. 
This view is of the Presidential motorcade on Main Street that November afternoon. 

ourpresidents:

Shortly after noon on November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated as he rode in a motorcade through Dealey Plaza in downtown Dallas, Texas. 

Crowds of excited people had lined the streets to wave to the Kennedys that afternoon.  The Presidential procession traveled along a ten-mile route that wound through downtown Dallas on the way to the Trade Mart where the President was scheduled to speak at a luncheon.

The car turned off of Main Street at Dealey Plaza around 12:30 p.m.  As it was passing the Texas School Book Depository, gunfire suddenly reverberated in the plaza.  Read more.

This view is of the Presidential motorcade on Main Street that November afternoon. 

life:

From John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s nomination acceptance address, now commonly referred to as “the New Frontier speech,” delivered at the Democratic National Convention, July 15, 1960, in Los Angeles:

“We are not here to curse the darkness; we are here to light a candle. As Winston Churchill said on taking office some twenty years ago: If we open a quarrel between the present and the past, we shall be in danger of losing the future. Today our concern must be with that future. For the world is changing. The old era is ending. The old ways will not do.”

On the 48th anniversary of JFK’s assassination, here, an exclusive look at unpublished, never-seen photos of our 35th president.

life:

From John Fitzgerald Kennedy’s nomination acceptance address, now commonly referred to as “the New Frontier speech,” delivered at the Democratic National Convention, July 15, 1960, in Los Angeles:

“We are not here to curse the darkness; we are here to light a candle. As Winston Churchill said on taking office some twenty years ago: If we open a quarrel between the present and the past, we shall be in danger of losing the future. Today our concern must be with that future. For the world is changing. The old era is ending. The old ways will not do.”

On the 48th anniversary of JFK’s assassination, here, an exclusive look at unpublished, never-seen photos of our 35th president.

There are no faint hearts in Fort Worth and I appreciate you being here this morning. Mrs. Kennedy is organizing herself. It takes longer, but of course, she looks better than we do when she does it.

President John F. Kennedy

A light rain was falling on Friday morning, November 22, but a crowd of several thousand stood in the parking lot outside the Texas Hotel where the Kennedys had spent the night. A platform was set up and the president, wearing no protection against the weather, came out to make some brief remarks.  He opened with the words above and afterwards reached out to shake hands.

John Fitzgerald Kennedy

May 29, 1917 - November 22, 1963

(via ourpresidents)

doristruong:

washingtonpoststyle:

This was the front page of The Washington Post 48 years ago today.
Former Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee reflects on his friend, JFK, here:
“I don’t want to disappoint too many people, but … the number of interesting political, historical conversations we had, you could stick in your ear. It wasn’t that many. … We talked about girls.”

Will have to look for Dallas’s take when I get a chance.

doristruong:

washingtonpoststyle:

This was the front page of The Washington Post 48 years ago today.

Former Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee reflects on his friend, JFK, here:

“I don’t want to disappoint too many people, but … the number of interesting political, historical conversations we had, you could stick in your ear. It wasn’t that many. … We talked about girls.”

Will have to look for Dallas’s take when I get a chance.

life:

To quote this (wonderful) submission from The Modern History:

“It’s hard not to love the March 26, 1971 cover of LIFE featuring Walter Cronkite. While I may be too young to remember Cronkite while he was still  broadcasting, he remains one of the great broadcasters to grace American  network news. The cover sums him up perfectly: a nice guy.”

See more covers from 1971 here.

life:

To quote this (wonderful) submission from The Modern History:

“It’s hard not to love the March 26, 1971 cover of LIFE featuring Walter Cronkite. While I may be too young to remember Cronkite while he was still broadcasting, he remains one of the great broadcasters to grace American network news. The cover sums him up perfectly: a nice guy.”

See more covers from 1971 here.

thedailywhat:

One Of These Things Is Not Like The Others of the Day: Hint: It’s the one with the cover story about how it’s completely okay, if not beneficial, to feel unease about future uncertainties, as opposed to, say, riot in the streets until sh*t gets done.
Sadly, this is a fairly common occurrence.
[@ggreenwald.]

thedailywhat:

One Of These Things Is Not Like The Others of the Day: Hint: It’s the one with the cover story about how it’s completely okay, if not beneficial, to feel unease about future uncertainties, as opposed to, say, riot in the streets until sh*t gets done.

Sadly, this is a fairly common occurrence.

[@ggreenwald.]